Posts Tagged ‘september gardening advice’

September Gardening Advice

September 2nd, 2019 | News | 0 Comments

Mr Fothergill's September Gardening Advice

There’s no doubt about it, September is summer’s swan song. Despite the pleasant temperatures, the days are getting shorter, bringing with them cooler, longer nights.

From rich, burnt oranges to fiery reds, September’s flowerbeds are full of vibrant blooms. Whilst on allotments, gardeners are enjoying bountiful harvests of beans, carrots and potatoes. And if you look beyond the foliage, Halloween pumpkins are making their growing presence felt, ready to take their turn in the spotlight.

So, whilst the sun is here, take the time to get outside and enjoy it. Because in a month’s time, as you dig out those heavy jumpers, the warm embrace of summer will be but a distant memory.

In the Flower Garden

Perennials

If perennials are past their best, dig them up, divide and re-plant. Not only are you invigorating the clump, but you’ll get more flowers next season. Ensure these plants are watered-in and mulched. For plants, such as dahlias, continue to deadhead and tie-in.

A close up focusing on some white and light pink fuschia flowers with green leavesAnother way to increase plant stock is to take cuttings. Tender perennials, such as penstemons, salvias and fuchsias are ideal for this. Once potted up, they’ll quickly establish a healthy root system. Ensure they’re placed in a sunny, frost-free protected area. Overwatering, or keeping them somewhere damp may lead to dampening off, so check on your cuttings regularly.

Of course, you can buy new perennials and plant them. As the ground’s still warm, they’ll have time to establish themselves before temperatures drop. Then, with the arrival of spring, they’ll emerge healthy and ready to grow.

Borders

Although summer is still hanging on, it’s time to look ahead to next spring. Give your borders a refresh and clear away fading summer bedding. If you’re not planting autumn flowers, such as chrysanthemums, clear weeds, add compost, and think about what to plant for the following spring. Biennial varieties such as wallflowers, foxgloves, as well as polyanthus, pansies and sweet williams can be planted.

Bulbs

Although it’s still too early to plant tulip and allium bulbs, amaryllis and hyacinth bulbs can be planted. By forcing their growth, you could be enjoying their colourful, scented blooms throughout the festive season.

If you’re thinking ahead to spring, daffodil, crocuses, bluebells and lily bulbs can be planted. Plant them straight into the ground, at a depth of three times their height, or pot them up in containers.

Hanging baskets

To keep your hanging baskets looking at their best for as long as possible, ensure you feed and water regularly. Deadheading is also essential. But there will come a time when plants will have given their all, so think about what to replace. Whether it’s polyanthus or pansies, bring colour to your autumn, by freshening the soil and re-potting your hanging baskets.

Pots

Two homemade 'pot feet' in the shapes of bears holding up a terracotta plant pot, raising it off the ground to help it drain waterIf you have pots that sit outside, it’s time to raise them off the ground. Using bricks or ‘pot feet’ protects your plants by keeping them off the ground to allow the rain to drain off easily. This will also help prevent winter frosts from cracking your pots.

You may want to plant up your pots for the autumn season. Consider heather, cyclemen and trailing ivy. Place them where they can be seen, as you’ll want to see as much life as possible in your garden over the wintry months.

Greenhouse

With greenhouse plants spent, now’s the time to give it a thorough clean. This also applies to your permanent cold frames. Dispose of old plants, and remove all pots and containers as they can be protecting pests. Ensure all glass is cleaned with warm soapy water. Also, clean the greenhouse floor, as potential pests and diseases could still be lurking. If you’re planning to grow anything in the next few months, then your greenhouse will need as much light and warmth as possible. Pack away any shading you put up during the summer months. Carry out any maintenance needed, clean leaves from guttering (including downpipes and water butts), and test greenhouse heaters.

Sowing

Seeds such as sweet peas, centaurea and poppies can now be sown into trays or modules. Don’t let them dry-out, and as temperatures start to drop, ensure preparations are made to see them through the colder months.

Lawn

After a dry summer, and constant use, lawns will now need your attention. Over the coming weeks, grass slows its growth, so you’ll be mowing less frequently. Re-lay any bare patches with new turf, or re-sow seeds directly into the soil. Scarify, aerate and apply a dressing to the lawn. Keep edging in check, and remove any fallen foliage, as this can encourage thatching.

On the Veg Patch

Harvest

A close up of two pumkpins ready to be harvested on an allotment patchSquashes and pumpkins will be plumping and colouring. Once their vines are cracked and withered, you can harvest them. Leave them somewhere dry and bright for a few days so their skins can harden off. Stored correctly, these could last well into next spring.

Lift any remaining onions now before the weather turns for the worse. Once lifted, shake off any loose soil and leave them to dry for a week or two. Either somewhere dry and bright outside, or in a greenhouse. These then can be hung and stored to use when you’re ready.

Fruit

Apples and pears are ready to be picked. If you’re planning to store them, ensure none are spoilt and place apart on dry sand in a paper-lined box.  Store them somewhere, dark and cool, and check every so often to make sure none have spoilt.

Autumn raspberries, on the other-hand, will keep producing right up until the first frost, but the key is to keep picking.

If you’re hoping to grow more strawberries next year, then now’s the time to plant. Whether they’re newly bought plants, or runners from your own plants, get them in the ground. With the ground still warm, and the temperatures mild, this will give them enough time to get established.

Winter vegetables

This month consider planting over-wintering onion sets. Spinach, pak choi and radishes can be directly sown into the ground. Keep a cloche close, as night temperatures will be on the decline.

Tomatoes

By now, your tomato plants will have done their job. With all tomatoes picked, remove and dispose of the spent plants. Place any remaining green tomatoes in a paper-lined shoebox with a ripened banana, and keep somewhere warm. Check regularly, and once reddened, remove. Failing that, green tomatoes make excellent chutney.

Once you’ve cleaned your greenhouse, consider sowing a crop of hardy lettuce or spinach for the colder months.

Green manure growing in a bedGreen manure

If you’re not planning to grow anything over winter, then consider growing green manure in your empty beds. Not only will this help suppress weeds, it can help break up heavy soil. Come March, cut it up and dig into the soil, as this will provide many of the soil’s required nutrients.

Pests

Keep vigilant this month, your harvest-ready vegetables and ripening fruit will be a calling card for various pests. One culprit is the wasp. It won’t take him long to damage and spoil your crop. Hang wasp traps in your trees and bushes.

However, as wasps are also beneficial for your garden (they eat aphids, caterpillars and other pests as well as being good pollinators), you may want to consider a more humane way to deter them. One option is to cover your crops with fine netting or mesh.

Other jobs

Bring in any indoor plants you rested outside over the summer months.

Net ponds to prevent autumn leaves and debris clogging them up.

Reduce the frequency of watering your houseplants.

If you haven’t done so already, order your allium and tulip bulbs for next spring.

While flowers such as dahlias are still blooming, take cut flowers for the home.