Posts Tagged ‘how to’

How to Build a Raised Bed?

April 30th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

Spring is the perfect time of the year to start a raised bed. Here are some tips on how to build your own:

Prepare the Ground

  • Let’s start by laying cardboard over the area the new bed will occupy. This will help to clear all the grass and weeds beneath.
  • The first thing to do is to remove any staples and bits of tape that are left on the cardboard you are going to use, as they won’t decompose.
  • Then, spread your cardboard all over your growing area. This will stop the weeds and the grass growing through.
  • Lay bark chippings directly onto the cardboard to give a neat and tidy finish.
  • A good tip is to make the cardboard pieces overlap, so no weeds can creep through any gaps.
  • Once the ground covered you can start making your raised bed.

 

Make the Bed Sides

  • Measure and cut your wood planks to size. This will create the four walls of your raised bed, all of equal length.
  • Drill some pilot holes, this will make it easier to screw the walls together. 2 holes in each plank is sufficient.

 

Assemble the Raised Bed

  • The walls of the bed need to be laid out, so that each of the planks overlaps the next. With the pilot holes located at the overlapping end.
  • Use long screws to screw the walls together, so that each wall is properly secured to the next.

 

Fill your Raised Bed

  • To start, add a layer of compost to the bed. This will give a nutrient-rich, moister-attentive layer for the roots to grow down into.
  • Use a rich top soil for the second layer. Its finer texture will enable you to sow and plant immediately.
  • You can now sow and plant, enjoy!

 

 

These are just a few tips and ideas to help you create your own raised bed in your garden. If you are planning your own, comment below or head over to our Facebook and Twitter page and let us know your tips and what you are planting.

Mr Fothergill’s Easy Grow Guides: How To Grow Carrots

April 24th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

 

 

Carrots are one of those vegetables that you can grow at home in your garden really easily and taste *better* than what you can buy in the shops.  A freshly pulled carrot from the plot tastes better than even the best quality organic carrot in a little boutique farm shop.  This is because the sugars in a freshly pulled root haven’t had time to turn to starch, and so the very best tasting carrot is eaten straight from plot to pot to plate.

You can sow carrots from early spring until mid-summer.  Try out different varieties to give you an array of colours from the regular orange through to the deepest of purples and reds, or to the other end of the colour spectrum with pale yellow and cream roots.

You can sow carrot seeds regularly – try every three week intervals – to ensure you have a continuous supply for the kitchen.  Towards the end of the sowing season, sow varieties that stand well in the soil as it turns colder during winter and you can maybe manage to supply yourself with carrots all year round.  No more tasteless supermarket carrots!

Our best selling carrots are reliable for beginner growers and seasoned gardeners alike, so think about trying from the following selection if you are growing for the first time, or if you want to try something new then explore the many carrot varieties on offer in our website 

  • Autumn King 2: A reliable maincrop that has a long season and a Best Buy variety recommended by gardening press and consumer groups.
  • Carrot Nantes 5: A delicious early variety good as ‘finger’ carrots. The blunt-ended roots have an outstanding flavour.
  • Royal Chantenay 3: Distinctly sweet tasting and succulent, short conical roots that can be used whole as ‘baby’ carrot or left to mature.
  • Parmex: A super early, round carrot, suitable for raising under glass, in the flower garden or on patios. Ideal for shallow soils.
  • Resistafly: A British-bred variety with improved resistance to carrot fly.  The roots have superb colour, a small core and a sweet taste.
  • Harlequin F1: Highly attractive Nantes variety with an unusual mix of colours, from purple and orange to yellow and white.
Mr-Fothergills-Carrot-Resistafly-F1-Seeds

Carrot Resistafly F1 Seeds

Mr-Fothergills-Carrot-Autumn-King-2-Seeds

Carrot Autumn King 2 Seeds

Mr-Fothergill-Carrot-Harlequin-F1-Seeds

Carrot Harlequin F1 Seeds

Mr-Fothergills-Carrot-Royal-Chantenay-3-Seeds

Carrot Royal Chantenay 3 Seedsw to