Posts Tagged ‘garden design’

We are 40 and fabulous!

August 8th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

We are celebrating our 40th year in business this year. On the 17th August 1978 our company was created by Brian Carey and Jeff Fothergill. Jeff’s surname was chosen for the company’s brand and the ‘old boy character’ was born. The objective was to create a friendly and established feel. This certainly worked as many people are surprised that they’ve not been around much longer, convinced that they remember their parents buying Mr Fothergill’s seeds years before it existed. In fact compared to other seed brands Mr Fothergill’s is a relative youngster but it was the injection of new ideas and application of our youthful enthusiasm for selling seeds that has driven the company from a tiny start-up to one of the largest packet seed suppliers in Europe.

A printed declaration of seeds per packet, foil sachets and pictoral packets of British native wild flowers are just a few of the things that where pioneered by us and are now taken for granted.

Over the past four decades we have added other brand names to our portfolio and now operate three brands in the retail market with Mr Fothergill’s, Johnsons and Country Value. These brands have also worked in partnership with well-known organisations and personalities to produce separate specialist seed ranges including; The Royal Horticultural Society, Sarah Raven, Jekka McVicar and David Domoney. They have also been keen to support charities where ever they can and currently raise funds through product sales and other activities for Greenfingers, The Royal Hospital Chelsea, Plant Heritage, The RSPB and The Bumble Bee Conservation Trust.

Management of the company has now changed to a second generation with John Fothergill and David Carey taking over the reigns as joint managing directors so it remains a wholly family owned and run business.

David & John said “We feel lucky to be working in an industry that ultimately creates joy, satisfaction, relaxation and purpose (to name but a few things) across such a wide spectrum of people. Service, quality, choice and innovation are the four cornerstones of our business that shape what we offer and how we work with our customers. Something that we will remain focused on for the next forty years and hopefully beyond”.

Mr-Fothergills-40th-anniversary-1970-style-garden

The 1970’s Garden

The Modern Garden

Our Mr Fothergill’s trials team have created two gardens on the Suffolk trial ground this year to celebrate the 40th anniversary. They have been designed to show the shift in trends over the years with a typical small garden of the 70’s with neat formal lines of bedding versus an up to date small garden that incorporates flowers with fruit and vegetables, upcycling and area for relaxation.

 

 

 

Choosing the Right Layout for Your Vegetable Garden Design [video]

April 25th, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Vegetable Garden Design - Nation of Gardeners SaladNew or old gardens can always be improved using dedicated vegetable beds that can help with productivity. A simple vegetable bed system will help you to plan, tend and harvest your crops with ease. This will leave you with a vegetable garden to be proud of. This post and the video below shares advice on vegetable garden design and how to make the most of the space that you have. 

  • Growing vegetables in allocated beds has many advantages. Narrow beds ensure growing areas can be tended from surrounding paths, this eliminates the needs to step on beds and crops. This creates a healthier soil for your plants, in turn providing you with plenty of crops.
  • Soil manures can be planted in specific areas when using beds preventing the need to spread manure across entire plots.
  • A bed system provides order for crops but also makes crop protection easier, as you only need to cover particular beds with their specific protection.
  • Using vegetable beds also provide an accessible garden by collating similar vegetables into the same bed making the gardening easier to manage.
  • Beds can be laid out in two ways, soil-level or raised.
    • Soil level beds are easy to work out, simply define bed edges with string and peg down. Then you can prepare the ground within the string.
    • Edging around beds to create raised beds offers a more permanent solution and a physical feature in your garden. Raised beds physically defines the vegetable beds and separates the various vegetables. Edging for beds does however cost more and more effort is required to build them and then fill them with compost and top soil.
  • You must try to make it possible for the centre of beds to be reached easily from the paths that surround them. Aim for a bed width of 3 – 4 feet or 90 – 120cm, this will give ample space for reaching to the centre of the bed.

These are just a few tips and tricks on vegetable garden design. Let us know if you have any further tips in the comments below.  You can also find the Mr Fothergills range of bed kits and covers here.

Vegetable Garden Design: Choosing the Right Layout for Your Garden

Vegetable Garden Design – Choosing the Right Layout for Your Garden

Companion Planting Made Easy [video]

January 17th, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Companion planting is when you choose to plant different plants together, so that one plant benefits the other. There are thousands of possibilities but choosing the correct plants can be tricky. GrowVeg has diligently researched companion planting to save you time when selecting the correct companion planting combinations for your garden. Let us guide you through easy companion planting tips to help you get it right in your garden.Lettuce 'Little Gem', an Award of Garden Merit variety. Image ©GardenPhotos.com

  • Many flowering plants attract pest-eating insects. Poached egg plants are great at drawing in hoverflies which control aphids away from nearby lettuce.
  • Borage is known to attract both bees and tiny pest-eating wasps, making it a great companion for tomatoes.
  • Crimson clover has been proven to grow well with broccoli, it encourages the expansion of the local spider population which in turn controls many pests.
  • Particular companion plants lure some insects away from crops. Nasturtium is a great example of this, if planted close to broad beans, so that blackfly will gorge on nasturtiums whilst ignoring the beans.
  • Similarly, nasturtium also attracts hungry caterpillars away from brassicas, like cabbage.
  • Other plants have a very strong scent, this confuses pests by masking the smell of the host plant. For example, garlic has been found to deter the green peach aphid. Therefore a perfect companion to vulnerable fruits such a peaches and nectarines.
  • In many instances, plants make suitable companions as they offer physical advantages. Tall growing sunflowers offer shade & support for scrambling cucumbers and climbing beans, which in hotter climates can become sun-stressed.
  • The ‘Three Sisters’ method is an example of physical advantages. This involves growing beans, corn and squash together. The large leaves from the squash help to smother weeds. Whilst the beans and corn return the favour by disorientating squash vine borers. The beans also use the corn as a support to scramble up, while fixing nitrogen at their roots to the benefit of the other sisters.

These are just a few scientifically proven companion planting combinations. The video below offers a few more for you to try. If you have any great combinations, please leave them in the comments below.

GrowVeg – Companion Planting Made Easy