Posts Tagged ‘flower garden’

How to Harden Off Indoor Sown Plants

May 15th, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Tomato Plants

Preparing plants for planting outside is an important part of the growth process when plants have been sown indoors so that it is not a shock to the system. So how do you harden off indoor sown plants?

Hardening off involves acclimatising plants that have previously been sown inside.  If this process is not followed through correctly it can destroy the plants that you have so lovingly taken the time to grow and nurture.  The process of hardening off should take a week but may possibly take up to two.  It important to not harden off your plants too soon as it can weaken them, the timings to hardening off can be discovered in the video below.

However there are some top tips offered for the hardening off process:

  • Always grow a few extra plants in case of failure in timing, if you have too many you can pass them on
  • Never rush hardening off, your plants will benefit dramatically from the process
  • You must also harden off shop bought plants, as they will also need to be acclimatised to your garden and may have been grown in glasshouses and polytunnels meaning they are not so hardy as they might look.

These are just a few of the tips offered within this video. If you have any tips for the hardening off process yourself, please do share them and let us know!

What to do in the Garden in April

April 1st, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

April is perhaps the busiest month in the garden. With temperatures fast warming, it’s time to get all your plans in place for the season ahead (but don’t forget about Mr Frost, who can still catch you out!).

By this stage in the season you more than likely already have vegetable and flower seedlings to tend to, along with ambitions to get plenty more sown for a productive and colourful summer season.
Hardy annual flowers and vegetables can now be sown outside, directly where you want them to grow, reducing your work load.

April offers the ideal conditions for planting out a wide range of larger container plants, too. Perhaps you over-wintered last year’s sowings of herbaceous perennial plants. They can now be moved from cold frames and nursery beds and planted in their final positions.

Strawberry Sweetheart - AprilTrees and shrubs can also be set out this month to provide shape, structure and ‘backbone’ to your border and container displays. Hardy fruit trees, bushes, canes and runners can all be planted too. Strawberry runners for example are despatching from the nursery now.

With so much to be done this month, the question is how will you fit it all in to your schedule. Our breakdown of essential jobs for April, should help you get your plans and plants in order.
In the flower Garden/on the patio

April - Sweet peas from Mr Fothergill'sSweet peas sown last autumn or during the winter months should be ready for planting out this month. These tough scented climbers will cope with cooler soils and late spring temperatures, quickly establishing for a show stopping display of early summer colour. Just make sure to harden them off before planting, by placing them outside by day and back under cover each evening for a week or so. Then set them out in well prepared soil, with lots of added manure.
If you haven’t already sown sweet peas you really are missing out. These easy to grow climbers offer some of the best scent and colour for the garden (and for indoor vase displays). Fortunately they can be sown outside this month too.  If you don’t have space for the climbing varieties, try dwarf types such as ‘Patio Mixed’ or ‘Dwarf Explorer’.

  • Plenty of life left in spring containers and bedding displays

Spring bedding plants such as pansies, primrose and bellis, whether set out in the soil or in patio pots and baskets, should have enough reserves to carry on until late May when you can replace them with summer options. To ensure they go the distance, use these three top tips:

  • Deadhead: remove all spent flowers to prevent plants diverting their energy on setting seed. Removing flowers encourages more to develop, carrying colour through to summer.
  • Chop back: If plants have become straggly you can cut them back by half. They’ll lose their looks for a week or two but will soon be flowering again over neat and tidy foliage.
  • Offer a regular feed: With plants in full swing, offer a liquid feed every two weeks to support their growth and encourage the best looking displays.

 

Ornamental grasses from seed

Ornamental grasses add a touch of elegance to mixed summer borders, creating movement with their nodding seedheads, and going on to add autumn interest – the dried golden seedheads and foliage look stunning when caught by an autumn frost.
As you make your flower sowings this month, save some space for these classy border additions. Sow indoors or directly outside where they are to grow.
Top choices to try include Bunny tails (Lagurus ovatus,), cloud grass (Agrostis nebulosa), goldentop grass (Lamarkia aurea) and silky spike melic (Melica ciliate). For a winning mix of annual and perennial ornamental grasses try the Mr Fothergill’s Grasses Collection:

Hardy herb containers

grow new herbs - AprilWhile tender herbs need to stay on the windowsill, you can get creative with hardy herbs in the garden this month.  Not many gardeners have the luxury of a dedicated herb garden, but fortunately most hardy herbs grow under the same conditions and will thrive together in a mixed herb container.
Avoid traditional herb planters with side planting holes, unless you can be sure you’ll keep up with watering. These dry out very quickly and are hard to rewet fully. Instead, select a wide container and add a mix of herbs as you would a mixed summer patio container.  A 50:50 mix of multipurpose compost and loam-based John Innes no.3 is ideal for herb containers.  Top tip: Use a high nitrogen feed with low potassium levels when feeding herbs. This will encourage lots of leafy growth rather than flowers.

  • Deadhead spend spring flowering bulbs such as daffodils and tulips. But leave their stems and foliage to die back naturally, placing energy back into the bulbs for the best display next year.
  • Treat fences, sheds and other wooden structures with a paint or preservative before spring growth makes access difficult

 

On the veg patch

  • Successional sowing

When it comes to vegetable sowing don’t, do it all in one hit, this will simply lead to a glut of produce later in the year. Instead, adopt the successional sowing method – smaller batches of seed sowing done every two weeks or so, which leads to a constant supply of ready to pick produce through the season, with few gaps and no gluts.

April - Broad Beans AguadulceHardy vegetables to sow outside this month:

Broad beans
Beetroot
Brussels sprouts
Calbrese
Broccoli
Summer and autumn cabbages
Cauliflower
Chicory
Carrots
Leeks
Pak Choi
Parsnip
Radish
Spinach
Spring onions
Swede
Swiss chard

Also plant out onions sets and seed potatoes

  • Hand pollinate early fruit trees

Early flowering fruits such as cherries, greengages, nectarines and peaches will benefit from hand pollination, as it may be still too early for most pollinating insects to do the work for you. Use a small artist’s paint brush to gently transfer pollen from one flower to another.

 

In the Greenhouse/ on the windowsill

  • Focus on Half Hardy Annuals

With hardy annual sowings now being made outside, you can give windowsill and greenhouse space over to half hardy annuals that need a bit of extra warmth to get started. If this is not possible, wait until the second half of May and sow half hardy annuals outside where you want them to grow.

  • Plug plants

If sowing isn’t your thing, or you’ve simply run out of space already, our bedding and vegetable plug plant varieties become ready for despatch this month. Here we’ve done the finicky first-stage work for you, simply pot up our plug plants on delivery and grow on in frost-free conditions until ready to plant out in late May/early June. If you’ve got the space to grow them on, you can even set them directly into hanging baskets and patio containers, for effortless displays come summer.

  • Early start on summer herbs

It’s too early and too cold to think about sowing or planting tender herbs outside, but you can make an early start with your favourite flavour boosters this month by sowing small pots on a sunny windowsill.  Basil, coriander, oregano, chervil and other frost tender herbs can be sown every four weeks or so between April and July for consistent supply of succulent fresh leaves. If sowing your favourite herbs this way is too time consuming try the Mr Fothergills’ Pot Toppers – a range of popular herbs embedded into seed mats – simply fills a large pot with compost, place a seed mat on the surface, cover lightly with more compost and water in. With 3 x 20cm mats per pack you’ll have a full summer of fresh herbs ahead of you.

Greenhouse growers will already have their tender crops well underway, but if you grow tomatoes, peppers and chillies out in the garden, April is the ideal month to sow their seeds. This ensures that the plants will not get too big before planting out in early June, once all threat of frost is gone.April

Sow seeds in trays, modules or small pots of multipurpose compost and set on a warm windowsill or in a heated propagator, aiming for around 21C.  Turn off the heat and remove covers once the majority of seedlings are on show. Transfer individual seedlings

Greenhouse growers can now prepare greenhouse borders, or stock up on grow bags and containers ready to plant out or pot up tomatoes, chillies and peppers. Other things to plant in the greenhouse include watermelons, cucumbers, sweet potatoes.

  • Sowing sunflowers

There’s a simple pleasure in watching a towering sunflower develop through the season, especially when you’ve raised it from seed yourself. If you are looking to grow a giant this summer, it pays to start as early as possible, giving your plants the longest growing season. Sow seeds indoors through April, ready for hardening off in late May for planting out.

For the tallest plants try Sunflower ‘Giant Single’. For the largest flower heads and lots of edible seeds, try Sunflower ‘Titan’. For a shorter, decorative addition to your summer displays try Sunflower ‘Sunburst’, ‘Magic Roundabout’ F1 or ‘Little Leo’.

  • Keeping cool

On sunny days, greenhouses can quickly overheat- even this early in the season.  Prevent this with a three pronged approach:
1) Open vents and doors on hot days (think about fittings auto openers)
2) Put up shade netting or shade paint so vulnerable plants and young seedlings don’t frazzle on sunny days.
3) Damp down the floors and staging once or twice a day to raise humidity levels and bring the ambient temperature down.

 

What to prune in April

  • Stone fruit trees such as cherries and plums can be pruned now that the risk of contracting silver leaf disease has passed (it enters plants on winter rain).
  • Fig trees to can be pruned to keep their shape and size.
  • Check all shrubs and hedges for bird nesting activity before carrying out any pruning. If nests are spotted, wait until summer before trimming your plants – it is illegal to intentionally damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird whilst it is in use.
  • Winter-stemmed shrubs like Cornus and Salix should be cut back hard to encourage new shoots for next winter’s display.
  • If not already done, remove any dead foliage growth left on herbaceous perennials before new growth takes over.

 

Weed control

By mid spring weeds start to grow rampantly, annual weeds will be germinating freely in unworked soils, and perennial types will be setting down roots to really take hold.
Ideally dig out perennial weeds by hand, but be thorough. Many perennial weeds, including dandelion and couch grass, will regrow from the smallest piece of root left in the soil. If hand weeding is not possible use weedkillers responsibly, seeking organic options where possible.
The best way to keep on top of annual weeds such as chickweed and shepherds purse is to hose your border and veg patch soil at least once a week. Aim to do this on a sunny or windy day, so dislodged weeds wither on the surface – rainy weather can actually set them back into the soil!

Companion Planting Made Easy [video]

January 17th, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Companion planting is when you choose to plant different plants together, so that one plant benefits the other. There are thousands of possibilities but choosing the correct plants can be tricky. GrowVeg has diligently researched companion planting to save you time when selecting the correct companion planting combinations for your garden. Let us guide you through easy companion planting tips to help you get it right in your garden.Lettuce 'Little Gem', an Award of Garden Merit variety. Image ©GardenPhotos.com

  • Many flowering plants attract pest-eating insects. Poached egg plants are great at drawing in hoverflies which control aphids away from nearby lettuce.
  • Borage is known to attract both bees and tiny pest-eating wasps, making it a great companion for tomatoes.
  • Crimson clover has been proven to grow well with broccoli, it encourages the expansion of the local spider population which in turn controls many pests.
  • Particular companion plants lure some insects away from crops. Nasturtium is a great example of this, if planted close to broad beans, so that blackfly will gorge on nasturtiums whilst ignoring the beans.
  • Similarly, nasturtium also attracts hungry caterpillars away from brassicas, like cabbage.
  • Other plants have a very strong scent, this confuses pests by masking the smell of the host plant. For example, garlic has been found to deter the green peach aphid. Therefore a perfect companion to vulnerable fruits such a peaches and nectarines.
  • In many instances, plants make suitable companions as they offer physical advantages. Tall growing sunflowers offer shade & support for scrambling cucumbers and climbing beans, which in hotter climates can become sun-stressed.
  • The ‘Three Sisters’ method is an example of physical advantages. This involves growing beans, corn and squash together. The large leaves from the squash help to smother weeds. Whilst the beans and corn return the favour by disorientating squash vine borers. The beans also use the corn as a support to scramble up, while fixing nitrogen at their roots to the benefit of the other sisters.

These are just a few scientifically proven companion planting combinations. The video below offers a few more for you to try. If you have any great combinations, please leave them in the comments below.

GrowVeg – Companion Planting Made Easy

Zinnias take their place in the sun as Mr Fothergill’s celebrates 2017

November 7th, 2016 | News, The flower garden | 0 Comments

Zinnias
Zinnias have been the subject of much breeding work in recent years and, as a result, are now more widely grown than they were 20 or 30 years ago. Their importance is being acknowledged by 2017 being declared ‘Year of the Zinnia’ by Fleuroselect, the organisation which trials and assesses new seed varieties from around the world to determine their suitability for European conditions. Mr Fothergill’s is celebrating the initiative with the introduction to its mail order catalogue and website a new formula mixture.

ZinniasBritish-bred Zinnia Solmar Mixed F1 will create a stunning display in pots, containers or garden borders. The beautiful, large flower heads last well with good heat and drought tolerance, and excellent disease resistance. This delightful annual needs little maintenance to put on an eye-catching display. The mature plants have a height of 45-60cm (18-24 in). A packet of 20 seeds costs £3.99.

New to both Mr Fothergill’s mail order and retail ranges is Zinnia Sombrero, which produces lots of single-flowered, red and white, jam tart-like blooms for many weeks through summer and into autumn. Plants reach around 35cm (14in) tall. A packet of seeds sufficient for 50 plants of Sombrero costs £2.35.

You can see Mr Fothergill’s range here or click here to request a catalogue .

What to do in the garden in November

November 1st, 2016 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Garden in November - Primula vulgaris (wild primrose)October is usually a transitional month; there is always a certain sadness in lifting and discarding all the half-hardy annuals and perennials that have delighted us throughout the summer. Once these have gone into the compost bin, containers and the flower garden look bare and empty, but at least it gives us the chance to replenish them with spring-flowering bulbs, such as daffodils, tulips and hyacinths, and spring bedding plants – primroses, polyanthus, violas and pansies. As gardeners, we are always looking forward, and as we plant these we know it will not be too long before we are enjoying colour in the garden once again.

It’s ‘all-change’ in the vegetable garden too. We made our last picking of pods of the new and exclusive runner bean Aurora on 23 October – and they were delicious with Sunday lunch – which we thought was great for a vegetable which we say in the catalogue crops only until September! But now it’s time to pull the plants up, along with those of courgettes, squashes and sweet corn. By the way, why not leave the roots of your runner beans in the ground, as these will provide some valuable nitrogen for the crop you will grow in that spot next year.

It may be ‘goodbye’ to summer vegetables, but the upside is we are now looking forward to savoy cabbages, leeks, parsnips, Brussels sprouts and kale. Call us old-fashioned, but we still believe sprouts and parsnips taste better once they have experience a frost or two – something we have not yet had on our trial ground, although nights have been getting markedly colder.

Flowers

Garden in november - Calendula and more at the Mr Fothergill's TrialsAlthough we feature several hardy annual which can be sown from August to October in our catalogue, remember you can equally well be guided by the weather and prevailing conditions. If it is still reasonably mild in your area and there remains some warmth in the soil, there is no reason why you should not extend sowing of these into the first half of November. Calendula Indian Prince, Californian poppy Jelly Beans, cornflower Blue Ball and larkspur Giant Imperial Mixed are just a few of our annuals which respond well to an autumn sowing.

The seed will germinate fairly quickly, and make small plants large enough to get through the winter unscathed before turning into fine specimens which will flower before those produced from a spring sowing. Larkspur and cornflower and perfect for cutting, so you could even grow a ‘crop’ of these in a spare section of the vegetable garden to provide you with armfuls of flowers for the house from late spring or early summer. Incidentally, we get a strong impression that these traditional, ‘cottage garden’ cut flowers are coming back into vogue, although they have never gone out of fashion with us!

Bush roses can be cut back to around half their height to prevent them being rocked and loosened in the soil by winter winds. Most will also benefit from harder pruning in March, before they start into growth for next summer. Climbing roses can also be pruned to keep them tidy. Cut out weak, spindly growth, while stronger growth can be pruned by around two thirds of its length. With all roses, aim to make a clean cut with secateurs just above an outward-facing bud.

Vegetables

Garden in November - Garlic Solent WightAlthough we mentioned it a couple of months ago, there is still just time to plant some garlic cloves. They are easy to grow and care for, and will provide an excellent crop from next May onwards. Early Purple Wight, as its name suggests, is one of the first to mature; its plump, purple-tinged bulbs will keep for up to three months, but are best consumed as soon as possible after lifting. Provence Wight yields really large, juicy bulbs, Lautrec Wight is ideal for those of you who like your garlic as ‘garlicky’ as possible, while Bohemian Rose and Mikulov, form Moravia, both store really well. Do find room for some garlic!

If you are growing Brussels sprouts and other winter brassicas, it may pay to net them against marauding pigeons, which can do much damage in the weeks ahead. Check sprout plants are still firm in the ground; if they seem loose at the base, hold the stem upright and heel in some soil to prevent further rocking.

Root crops such as carrot, beetroot and swede can withstand some frost, and are often best left in the ground until needed unless you have plenty of storage space indoors for them. They will certainly appreciate the added protection which a thick mulch of straw can provide before the weather turns really cold.

Maincrop potatoes in storage should be checked regularly for any signs of damage or disease. Ideally each tuber should be checked for rotting, which can spread fast. Any which show signs of rot should be removed at once, but can still be used if part of the tuber is still sound. Always store potatoes in ‘breathable’ bags, such as our heavy duty potato sacks. Never store your spuds in plastic bags, as this will cause them to rot in double-quick time.

Fruit

Garden in November - picking and storing applesNovember is a good time to prune fruit bushes and trees. Blackcurrants will benefit if around a third of the older, darker stems are cut back virtually to ground level with secateurs or a pair of loppers. This will encourage vigorous basal growth. Leave around six of the younger, paler stems, as these will produce next year’s crop, but remove any that look weak or unhealthy. Redcurrants, whitecurrants and gooseberries grown as bushes are treated differently from blackcurrants. Reduce branches by a quarter and cut side-shoots back to two or three buds.

On apple and pear trees, reduce this year’s growth on main branches by around a third, while cutting back side-shoots to about six buds. Dead or weak growth, plus any crossing branches, are best removed. The aim should be to try and produce a tree with a reasonably open centre.

If you have this autumn’s apples in store, check them regularly for signs of rot and any other disease. Brown rot can sometimes be a problem. This causes the fruit to become dehydrated and prune-like. Apples are best stored in a dry, airy, frost-free environment.

Strawberry plants tend to look rather rough at this time of year. To improve matters, cut away dead or diseased foliage with secateurs, as this will help prevent an accumulation of fungal spores which may over-winter and re-infect new growth next spring. Tidying up the plants allows better air circulation round the crowns, while cold can get into the soil, thereby inducing dormancy and the prospect of a good crop next summer.