Posts Tagged ‘container gardening’

Vertical Gardening – Grow More In Your Garden

March 25th, 2015 | The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Vertical gardening

With a little careful planning you can create your garden so plants that are happy to grow vertically still produce an abundant harvest whilst using a fraction of the ground space.

Grow a whole range of plants vertically including: melons, beans, squashes, grapes and kiwis using pergolas, canes, wigwams and wires on walls.  If you have wall space you can also grow a range of vegetables in wall mounted planters that helps you to grow crops and decoratively cover ugly garden walls.  You can also grow fruit trees against walls, as cordons and espaliers to maximise the space you have.

Get some tips in this video on planning a vertical vegetable plot to help you use your space to its absolute maximum.

Pot Toppers are perfect for patio veg gardeners

March 9th, 2015 | The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Pot Toppers from Mr Fothergill's

While an increasing number of householders like the idea of growing at least some of their own food, modern gardens are often too small for a traditional vegetable plot.  Would-be ‘Good Lifers’ can however look forward to a ready supply of salad leaves and herbs just outside the back door or on the patio thanks to a new idea from Mr Fothergill’s.

Pot Toppers is the name of Mr Fothergill’s new range of pre-sown circular 20cm (8in) wide seed mats that are designed to help out patio veg gardeners.  There are seven varieties – three mixed salad leaves and four popular herbs – and with three mats per packet householders can look forward to a season-long supply of their favourites however small the back garden may be.  They can even be grown on balconies, and container gardening is the ideal answer for those who have little or no garden, but still wish to ‘grow their own’.

Mr Fothergill’s David Turner says he believes Pot Toppers are also perfect for youngsters wishing to have a go at growing plants from seed for the first time.  Each has a recommended retail price of £3.45.

Look out for Mr Fothergill’s Pot Toppers online on the website, at garden centres and other retail outlets nationwide.

Serenity and a Ripple new at Mr Fothergill’s: Osteospermum and Petunia new varieties added to the range

February 16th, 2015 | News, The flower garden | 0 Comments

Osteospermum and Petunia“The best osteospermum available” is how Mr Fothergill’s plant manager Tom Stimpson describes the company’s brand new variety Osteopermum Serenity Blue Eyed Beauty.  “The Serenity series is famed for its naturally well branched, compact and rounded habit and long flowering season – from early June through to October, and this latest addition is a real stunner,” says Tom.  “It is easy to grow, with the minimum of attention required to keep plants looking good, and has superb garden performance, where it is ideal for patio containers in a bright, sunny spot.”

Serenity Blue Eyed Beauty is a unique colour in osteospermums, has the added advantage of remarkable floriferousness, and is already proving very popular with Mr Fothergill’s customers.  Plants reach a height of 35cm (14in).  A pack of five young plants cost £8.95, with despatch from mid to late April 2015.

Another brand new introduction for the 2015 season is the Cambridgeshire-bred Petunia Ripple – pictured here is Tumbelina Damson Ripple.  The Tumbelina series is well known to Mr Fothergill’s customers, who appreciate its reliable nature and abundance of fully double blooms.  Tom says what sets this new colour apart from many of its competitors is the reliable nature of the colour combination; blooms do not revert to one single colour, but keep their unique white and rich damson format all through summer, from June to October.  Tumbelina Damson Ripple is an outstanding subject for hanging baskets and other containers, where it trails to around 45cm (18in).  Again, a pack of five young plants cost £8.95, with despatch from mid to late April 2015.

You can order Osteopermum Serenity and Petunia Ripple from Mr Fothergill’s on the website, or by mail order from our catalogue.

Pot Toppers from Mr Fothergill’s are perfect for patio veg and container gardeners

September 25th, 2014 | News, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Pot ToppersWhile an increasing number of householders like the idea of growing at least some of their own food, modern gardens are often too small for a traditional vegetable plot.  Would-be ‘Good Lifers’ can however look forward to a ready supply of salad leaves and herbs just outside the back door or on the patio thanks to a new idea from Mr Fothergill’s.

Pot Toppers is the name of the new range of pre-sown circular 20cm (8in) wide seed mats.  There are seven varieties – three mixed salad leaves and four popular herbs – and with three mats per packet householders can look forward to a season-long supply of their favourites however small the back garden may be.  They can even be grown on balconies, and are the ideal answer for those who have little or no garden, but still wish to ‘grow their own’.

Mr Fothergill’s David Turner says he believes Pot Toppers  are also perfect for youngsters wishing to have a go at growing plants from seed for the first time.  Each has a recommended retail price of £3.45.

Look out for Mr Fothergill’s Pot Toppers at garden centres and other retail outlets nationwide.

Garden writers vote for Carol’s unusual drum planters

August 12th, 2014 | News, The flower garden | 0 Comments

Unusual drum plantersMany staff members at Mr Fothergill’s are also keen gardeners who enjoy taking their work home with them.  This summer the company challenged them to grow plants in unusual containers.

Twelve people rose to the challenge, and their handiwork was judged by members of the gardening press who visited the Mr Fothergill’s Kentford trial ground in Newmarket in early August.

The winner was Carol Parsons, who divides her time between the company’s seed testing laboratory and working in the trial ground.  Her winning entry was this pair of male and female metal drums sporting blue lobelia and pink petunia ‘hair’.

In second place was product development coordinator Pim Dickson who planted a brazier with flame-like celosias.

Among the entries were some weird and wonderful creations, including a brassière used as a hanging basket.  As one wag was heard to remark,  “It’s good to see underwear recycling in full swing!”

Pim Dickson's celosias planted in a fire basket

While the competition was mainly for the fun of growing the plants and the glory of winning, there was a first prize of a case of beer and a second prize of a bottle of wine.

A stroll into almost any allotment plot in the land will reveal unusual planters in old baths, toilets, old tyres and containers that would otherwise be described as old junk.

There have been some great examples of using broken crocks, discarded kitchen crockery and other containers to house alpine displays on the Flower Show circuit this year too.

Do you have an unusual planter?  Share your pictures with us on the Facebook wall and let us all see!