Posts Tagged ‘climber’

My Morning Glory Story

September 14th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Ipomoea (Morning Glory) 'Party Dress'

My ‘Heavenly Blue’ morning glories have been a disaster this year. Not a single flower on any of my plants around the garden. It’s my own fault, I was give a packet of seed from, well, another seed company…. How could I have been so foolish?!

I sowed the seed, I nurtured the plants, I love them so much that I planted them in four different places, I soaked them in the ferocity of the heat – and they’ve grown like mad. But not a single flower. Not one.

Of course, when I visited the Mr F trial ground recently my foolishness was revealed – ‘Heavenly Blue’ was doing great. That’ll teach me. I know whose seed to use next year.

But I also noticed another morning glory, a new one, that Mr F are introducing for next season. It’s called ‘Party Dress’, and you can see what a lovely colour it is. I especially like those electric flashes through the trumpets.

This variety is also a little more tolerant of chilly spring weather than ‘Heavenly Blue’, which is always useful, but it really does grow. I have just the place for it: under a big new elder I’m trialling with huge bold chocolate-coloured leaves. It should make a great support and set off the colour of the morning glory perfectly. And I bet you a million pounds it flowers.

The lovely Canary creeper

May 18th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Tropaeolum canariense (canary creeper)A climbing nasturtium can be a bit of a thug. Vigorous growth, large leaves… A climbing nasturtium can smother even the most robust of plants. The closely related canary creeper, Tropaeolum canariense, on the other hand, is a climbing annual that’s altogether more acceptable – more delicate – in its habits.

Like clematis, it clings to its supports by twining its leaf stalks around anything it meets, but its leaves are small, prettily divided and never smother. Its flowers are bright, delicate, beautifully shaped in bright butter yellow with a delightful patterning of red spots on the petals. It produces a long succession of flowers all summer. It’s very pretty, and repays a close look. Can we agree that it’s a lovely plant? But how to use it?

I’m sowing seeds now, three seeds in 9cm pots, and when they’re up and growing I’ll be planting them at the base of my outdoor tomatoes. And at the base of climbing outdoor cucumbers. And on the sunny side of established shrubs such as sarcococcas and daphnes. And under the delphiniums so that when the delph flowers are long gone, there’ll be canary coloured flowers snaking over the foliage. And amongst my hardy chrysanthemums, to twine over the dull foliage before the flowers come.

As I mentioned, sow three of those big fat seeds in 9cm pots. Do it today. Place the pots on an indoor windowsill or in a cold greenhouse (set mousetraps!) for the seeds to germinate and, when the windowsill plants start through, move them to a sunny sheltered place outside to develop.

When the roots emerge at the base of the pots, plant them out. As the plants grow, they may need guiding in the direction of the supports that I hope you’ve provided to help them get going. Then sit back and enjoy the show.

* The Chelsea Flower Show starts on Tuesday, but I’ll be there getting an early look at how things are coming together from Saturday morning and will be posting here every day for week starting on Sunday. So please check back here every day.

RHS award winners: Essential climbers

January 5th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Ipomoea 'Heavenly Blue' and Mina lobata

The new collaboration between Mr F and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) features seeds of flowers and veggies that have been awarded the prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM). I discussed these new ranges briefly here last year but I thought, as seed sowing season approaches, I’d take a closer look at some of the floral highlights. And the ipomoeas are especially interesting.

There are two AGM ipomoeas in the Mr F catalogue and, at first sight, they look completely unrelated.

Mina lobata (above right) features in the RHS range and, although long known by that name, it’s now been recognised as so similar to ipomoeas that it needs to be classified as one: so it’s now known, botanically, as Ipomoea lobata.

Fiery orange buds are held along arching stems, maturing to yellow and then cream but even as they pass their peak the new flare and the flowers stay tubular. It makes a great deal of growth, reaches 1-8-2.4m depending on the richness of the soil and the watering, and needs stout support. It flowers for months. Sow in frost free conditions from April.

The closely related Ipomoea ‘Heavenly Blue’ (above left) is also an AGM variety but has been listed for years so is not in the new RHS range. It’s very different, with large flared sky blue flowers that open early in the day and close by afternoon – which is why it’s called morning glory. It reaches the same height as Mina lobata but its growth is less bushy and dense. It’s one of the most beautiful of garden climbers, no garden should be without it.

Just to emphasise how varied the ipomoeas are, Mr F also lists two special varieties of sweet potato grown for their coloured foliage; they’re ideal in sunny containers and trail neatly. These foliage varieties of Ipomoea batatas do not have AGMs – but I suspect this is only because the RHS has not yet held a trial.

I think these varied ipomoeas deserve a try, don’t you? I’ll be growing them all this year.