Posts Tagged ‘cfs’

Look and learn

May 25th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Chelsea look and learn Dianthus display from Calamazag Plant Nursery

At the Chelsea Flower Show, we’re used to exhibits that simply look wonderful, and the Great Pavilion is full of them… fifty five exhibits winning Gold Medals. But this year there’s a display of pinks that perfectly combines an attractive display of well grown plants with information about them.

So often, all that accompanies the plants is the name. But Cornwall’s Calamazag Plant Nursery, in a simple, colourful and stylish way, tells us something about the history and propagation of these essential, sunloving perennials. And does so without our eyes glazing over – there’s just enough information to take in during a long day at a busy flower show, presented clearly and effectively.

For example: many of us know that the classic garden old Victorian pink ‘Mrs Sinkins’ was raised by the Master of the Slough Workhouse and named for his wife. But did you now that his original idea was to name it ‘Queen Victoria’ – until, shall we say, his wife made her feelings clear!

And did you know that in the 19th century, clove scented varieties were eaten in salads, used to flavour food and drinks, used to decorate cakes and as treatments for heartburn. Soaked in wine, clove scented pinks were also traditionally given to brides after marriage ceremonies.

Many of those old Victorian are still available, along with our wild native Cheddar pink, Dianthus gratianopolitanus. Almost wiped out by people digging up the plants in its native Cheddar Gorge and by scrub smothering the plants, the Cheddar pink increasing again.

It’s great to be able to admire a Chelsea exhibit and learn a little something too.

This year’s Chelsea colour

May 24th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Lupins and salvias in these rich colours were this year's fashionable Chelsea plants

This year, it’s dark blue, it’s purple, it’s lupins and it’s perennial salvias.

Every year at Chelsea there’s a colour or a plant – sometimes a very specific variety and sometimes a more general theme – that turns up all over the Show Gardens and all over the Great Pavilion. Informal, naturalistic planting now totally dominates but the key plants vary from year to year.

For a few years it was alliums, one year it was coppery-leaved sedges. It’s even been cow parsley – cow parsley! I never thought I’d hear people asking at the Mr F seed stand for packets of cow parsley seed!

This year I lost count of the number of show gardens using purple lupins in their plantings and using blue-purple perennial salvias. The Urban Flow Garden (above), designed by Tony Woods, is one of a number using both and placing them together very effectively right at the front of the display.

On the Gaze Burvill display dark salvias jostle with alliums and lavender, on the Spirit of Cornwall garden, designed by Stuart Charles Towner, salvias mingle with vivid blue anchusas, purple flowered chives, and borage. Although similar in tone, grouping these plants together well can be a challenge, the idea is for the whole display to be more than the sum of its parts but, sometimes, the parts is all it is.

Not so on the LG Eco-City Garden, designed by Hay-Joung Hwang, where salvias are artfully grouped with anchusas, cerinthe, alliums and purple-leaved fennel.

A noticeable second favourite plant this year is Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’. Used on show gardens to intermingle with the salvias or with sparky blue anchusas, it was also seen in bold groups in the Great Pavilion.

So… With little sign of cow parsley at the Show this year (but plenty along roadsides across the country, where it belongs), the Show’s signature plants really are worth growing. The trouble is, they sell out so fast.

Winter and summer at Chelsea

May 23rd, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Hellebores at The 2018 Chelsea Flower Show!

One of perennial challenges for Chelsea exhibitors is to hold back early flowering plants so they come to their peak at the Show, weeks or months later than normal, and to force late flowering plants into an early display.

The past master of all this is Johnny Walkers with his regular display of daffodils, held back in a cold store for the big day. Staged at the last possible moment, and the massed ranks of perfection completely replaced half way through the show as they wilt in the heat, it’s always a treat. Awarded a Gold Medal, of course.

But this year we have an even more amazing display: a whole exhibit of hellebores (above). Hold on, don’t they flower in January and February? Well, yes! Three months after their peak in the garden, Ashwood Nurseries from the West Midlands are staging a whole exhibit of their own amazing varieties in a huge range of colours and bicolours, single and double.

The plants had been in a cold store since October and removing them at the right time and bringing them on to ensure that they look their best – and look natural – at the Show is a real art. The display won a Gold Medal, of course, plus a special award from the President of the RHS.

And then, at the other extreme, there are the dahlias (below). I’ll be planting mine, grown from Mr F’s tubers in pots, later this week. But the Plant Heritage National Dahlia Collection, from Cornwall, have these summer and autumn specialities at their peak in full flower for the Show – now!

Again, they don’t look forced, they look natural… And at three months before they’ll be at their best in the garden, huge credit goes to Jon Wheatley for bringing them forward to perfection on the day and winning a Gold Medal.

This is what’s special about Chelsea. Exhibitors devote vast amounts of time, energy, expertise, ingenuity – not to mention expense – to bring us something special. And they inspire us all.

* The Chelsea Flower Show on TV today: BBC1, 3.45pm, Angellica Bell. BBC2, 8.00pm, Monty Don and Joe Swift.

Dahlias at The 2018 Chelsea Flower Show.