Posts Tagged ‘botanic nursery’

Foxgloves in the Chapel and at Chelsea

May 21st, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Foxgloves at the 2018 Chelsea Flower Show in the exhibit staged by The Botanic Nursery.

Foxgloves were an integral feature of the floral displays in St George’s Chapel on Saturday and they make quite an impact here at Chelsea where two entirely different exhibits featuring foxgloves stand out.

For many years we’ve enjoyed the displays staged by Terry Baker of The Botanic Nursery in Wiltshire, holder of the Plant Heritage National Collection of Digitalis (foxgloves). This year (above) Terry has combined traditional varieties and old favourites with recent introductions alongside some varieties that are only just coming on to the market. Intermingling them with the slender spires of the related verbascums works very well.

Then, in a dramatic contrast, on the Skin Deep garden (below) designed by Robert Parker, full flowered white foxgloves are set amongst large square silvered cement blocks. The overall effect is both rather stark and at the same time, positive and uplifting.

But not all foxgloves are good, I’m sorry to say. Without pointing the finger at specific exhibitors, I also came across some of the ugliest foxgloves I’ve ever seen! The unnaturally large and broad mouthed flowers glared up towards me and in an especially sickly purple, their throats spotted not with delicate speckles but with large, almost warty blotches. It takes hard work to make a foxglove ugly but someone has achieved exactly that.

But don’t let these horrors put you off. Give me the supremely elegant, white foxgloves used in St George’s Chapel and especially the pure white and angelically spotted form of our wild native foxglove, the flowers artfully poised on one side of the gently arching spike as nature intended.

Seeds sown in the next few weeks will make fine plants to go out in the garden in autumn to flower this time next year.

Pure white foxgloves set against silvered concrete blocks on the Skin Deep garden disgned by Robert Parker.