Posts Tagged ‘April gardening advice’

April Gardening Advice

April 1st, 2019 | News | 0 Comments

April Gardening Advice

Spring has sprung! We have more daylight, which is just as well, as we’re going to need as much time as possible to get our gardens and allotments summer-ready. But don’t be fooled into thinking winter has completely gone. Those sharp frosts are the sting in a waning season’s tail. Hold off planting what can’t be fleeced, cloched, or protected, until the last of the frosts have gone.

In the flower garden

Deadheading

The once-glorious daffodils will by now have seen better days, so deadhead them, before they go to seed. The energy will transfer to the bulb, in readiness for next year’s display. But don’t cut away the foliage, let it die back naturally to harness the sun’s energy, fuelling the bulbs for future seasons.

Winter pansies, will be keen to set seed, so regularly remove faded flowers to encourage new displays.

PrimrosesLift and divide Primroses for bigger displays next year

Another flower that has probably passed its prime is the primrose. If you’re hoping for bigger displays next year, then this is the time to lift and divide them. Whether it’s with your hands, or a trowel, prise the plants apart. Don’t worry about damaging them as they’re quite tough, and will respond quickly. Re-plant where you would like to see them appear next year, and water in well.

Support

The roses you finished pruning last month will now be full of life, sending new shoots skywards. You may need to stake and tie-in new growth. This also applies for other tall, climbing perennials. Not only will this help support the plant, but it’ll help prevent high winds from causing windrock to the rootball, or damaging young stems.

Weeds

With plants and borders springing into life, weeds will also start flourishing as they feed off the nutrients given to your flower borders. Ensure you weed regularly or they could smother young, emerging plants. Remove tap roots entirely or they will re-grow. Finally, mulch around your plants to suppress weeds and help retain moisture.

April is the time to get those summer bulbs in the groundBulbs

It’s time to get those newly-bought summer bulbs and corms into the ground, or into pots. If you’re planting in pots, ensure the compost has plenty of grit, so water can drain off easily and not cause the bulbs to rot. It’s also a good idea to place crocks at the base of the pot to improve drainage.

If you’re planting bulbs into beds, think about how the final display might look. Make sure there’s sufficient space and plenty of sunlight. If you haven’t planted bulbs before, then the rule of thumb is to plant the bulb at a depth of three times its height. If your soil is heavy, add grit to the base of the hole, and then fill with a gritted-compost mixture.

Sweet Peas

After pinching out your sweet peas last month, they should now be bushing up. Towards the end of the month, depending on weather, these can be planted out into their final growing positions. Whether it’s directly into the ground, or container, make sure you use a support so the tendrils have something to latch onto and push the plant up. Keep an eye on their growth, as they will quickly need to be tied in.

Container Plants

With new growth appearing daily, you may need to introduce a regular watering regime to your container plants. Make sure you remove weeds, and top up the soil with fresh compost or general-purpose fertiliser. Check that plants aren’t pot bound, and are free of pests. Finally, place them in the appropriate growing area, to ensure they respond successfully.

Hanging Baskets

If you’re looking forward to big floral displays this summer, then get your plug plants into your hanging baskets. Use fresh compost and a slow-release fertiliser. Water retention gel is a good option, to help them through those long hot summer days. Once potted up, keep them in the greenhouse until the last frost has passed. This will also give your plants a chance to grow on and settle into their hanging baskets. Next, place them in a cold frame, or outside during the day, for a week or two. Finally, place them in their final hanging positions and ensure a regular watering regime. Bear in mind they will require extra watering and feeding during the summer months.

April is the time to establish a regular lawn mowing routine

Lawn

It’s time to begin a regular mowing routine. Place the mower’s blades at a low level for a clean, sharp cut. Scarify and fork over any thatched areas to help with drainage. Keep borders strimmed, and cut edges with an edging tool. If your lawns aren’t seeing too much action at the moment, this might be the opportunity to give them a gentle feed, or sow grass seed onto bare patches.

Greenhouse

If you haven’t done so yet, clear and tidy your greenhouse. After a hard winter, there will be items stored that can be removed. Overgrown foliage needs to be cut away to ensure maximum sunlight, and it’s advisable to give the greenhouse a thorough clean, inside and out with warm soapy water.

Hardening Off

Towards the end of the month, you may want to start hardening off certain plants to get them ready for planting out in May. By hardening off, you’re simply getting indoor-sown plants acclimatised to cooler, outdoor temperatures. For example, if you’ve been growing sweet peas, they will grow all the better for a few weeks in a cold frame before planting out into their final position. If you don’t have a cold frame, then place your plants outside on a bright day for a few hours, then bring them in before the temperature drops, or the weather takes a turn for the worse.

On the veg patch

Sow

Now is the time to sow crops such as salads, radishes, beetroot, chard, kohl rabi, carrots and parsnips. If the ground is too cold, sow into modules, trays or pots. Keep them somewhere warm, with plenty of sunlight, such as a greenhouse or polytunnel.

If the ground is too cold then sow seeds into module trays or pots

Any seeds sown back in March may now need thinning out, or even re-potting. As you do so, remember that it’s important to hold the seedling by their ‘true leaves’, not their stems. While a damaged leaf won’t hamper the plant’s growth, a damaged stem will leave the young plant helpless.

If your ground is prepped and ready to go, think about sowing peas, leeks, carrots, broad beans or cabbage. Remember to sow little and often, otherwise, in a few months’ time you could end up with a glut.

If you have sown onion sets, make sure you net them. Birds will see them as a potential food source and remove them from the ground.

Potatoes

You should have now planted your chitted tubers. If they produce substantial foliage, earth up as this will both protect the plant, and encourage it to produce more potatoes. However, it’s a good idea to keep horticultural fleece handy, as a sharp frost could burn the plants, destroy the foliage and potentially kill the plant.

Structures

If you’re growing beans and peas, then think about setting up your runner bean poles. Peas will also need a support structure, such as netting, poles or twiggy hazel sticks. Prep the beds and get your structures ready.

Soft Fruit

Fruits such as strawberries, raspberries and gooseberries should be mulched. This feeds the plants, helps retain the moisture in the soil, and should give you better-tasting fruit. If you grow blueberries, make sure you use an ericaceous compost.

Remember to keep bird feeders topped up

Other

  • Keep an eye on weather reports, as sharp frosts can still occur, and potentially damage or kill young plants and seedlings.
  • Warmer temperatures will also encourage indoor plants to grow, so step-up their watering and feeding regime.
  • Continue to keep bird feeders topped up.