Posts Tagged ‘allotment tips’

How to Make Willow Structures for Your Garden

April 24th, 2017 | The flower garden, The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Willow is very satisfying to work with and lends itself to making rustic screens, structures and supports for a beautiful natural look. Willow is very satisfying to work with and lends itself to making rustic screens, structures and supports for a beautiful natural look. No special tools needed! It’s quick growing and produces lots of flexible stems – they are natural materials that you can work within the garden. This post and video will show you how to create a handsome hurdle, step by step. 

Both willow and hazel have a long history of use in a manner of different garden structures. In order to encourage the long straight stems required, the trees are periodically ‘coppiced’, when the stems are cut right back to a stump to encourage replacement shoots. You can buy ready to work with bundles of hazel or willow stems, or you can grow your own, cutting the stems right back to ground level then allowing new stems to grow in their place.

Willow grows quickest and produces highly flexible stems that are ideal for weaving. Dogwoods are also an excellent option for weaving with stems coming in a range of colours, from red to yellow. Hazel stems tend to be a little thicker and therefore make excellent beanpoles. Fences made from hazel or willow look stunning and they also help to filter the wind rather than deflect it avoiding the damaging eddies sometimes found at the bottom of solid walls. Lower woven hurdles make very pretty edges to raised beds, though bear in mind that close contact with the soil will reduce their lifespan. Alternatively, use woven hurdles as handsome screens to hide ugly pots or less attractive parts of your garden such as a compost area.

So how do you make a willow hurdle?

The video below offers step by step instructions on how to make a hurdle for your garden. If you have any top tips for willow structures, then please do let us know in the comments below.

Growing Carrots from Sowing to Harvest [video]

April 21st, 2017 | The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Growing Carrots from Sowing to Harvest - Mr Fothergills BlogEvery vegetable garden needs carrots and it’s actually quite easy to grow them from seed – but you must bear in mind some golden rules! In this post, we offer you some top tips on where to grow carrots, what type to grow and when to sow. The following video goes on to tell you the best way to plan your carrots and follows through to their harvest!

Where to grow carrots

  • You can grow carrots in raised beds or in patio tubs – the choice is yours, carrots can be grown just about anywhere.
  • They prefer full sun and well-dug, stone free soil.
  • Beds improved with well-rotted compost are ideal, though recently-manured beds may cause the roots to fork.
  • For best results, follow carrots on from a heavy feeding vegetable such as cabbage.

What type to grow

  • There are so many different carrots to choose from – sometimes it can be confusing on which one is best for you to grow!
  • Stump-rooted and finger-sized carrots are the quickest and can be grown on heavier soils that would cause longer roots to fork.
  • Medium or long-rooted carrots can be grown in lighter soils or in raised beds or deep containers filled with potting soil.
  • Maincrop types are perfect for sowing later in spring to produce roots for winter storage.
  • Carrots don’t just come in orange they have many colourful varieties!

When to sow carrots

  • Sow carrots from early spring to mid-summer, to then be lifted from late spring to early winter.
  • Stored roots will tide you over until the following spring.
  • Make the earliest sowings of fast-growing early varieties into greenhouse or polythene tunnel beds or pots kept under cover.
  • You can also sow earlier outside by using row covers or cold frames.

If you have any top tips on growing carrots then let us know on our blog or social media.

GrowVeg – Growing Carrots from Sowing to Harvest

How To Plant & Grow Asparagus Crowns

March 9th, 2017 | The vegetable garden | 0 Comments

Young asparagus crowns growing in raised bedsAsparagus is a very satisfying vegetable to grow in your own garden. But it does take time & patience to grow. In this short post, we will guide you through planting Mr Fothergill’s asparagus. 

  • Take the asparagus crowns from the sealed bag.
  • Make a trench, it must be wide enough to spread the roots out and give them room to grow. The trench must also be about 20 cm deep.
  • Within the trench, you’ll need to create a small ridge so that the asparagus can sit on top of these. The roots can then spread down the side.
  • Fill the trench back in and firm it down. It’s that easy!

Asparagus can take another two years to get a full harvest – but it’s worth the wait! If you have any further tips on planting and growing asparagus crowns, then you can let us know on this blog or over on our social media. You can buy our asparagus crowns on Mr Fothergill’s website here.

How To Plant & Grow Asparagus Crowns