November Gardening Advice

November-gardening-advice-2018

The smell of wood smoke, the crackle of bonfires and the colourful explosion of fireworks means we’re into November. So, get out the woollies, wrap up warm and embrace autumn. Collect conkers, kick-up fallen leaves, light fires and enjoy hearty soups made from your homegrown vegetables.

Although gardens and allotments are starting to wind down, there are still plenty of jobs that need doing which will keep you warm on a chilly day.

But if you don’t fancy venturing out into the dropping temperatures, then kick back and get cosy. This is a good time to take stock, think back to this year’s successes and failures, and consider what you want to grow next year. Draw up lists, make plans, and think ahead.

 

In the flower garden

 

TULIP BULBS

october-is-when-you-can-begin-to-think-about-planting-tulip-daffodil-and-allium-bulbs

Temperatures are on the decline, the ground is starting to feel the chill, and with little threat of tulip fire infection, now is a good time to plant your tulip bulbs. Avoid bulbs that show signs of decay, mould or damage, and plant three times to the depth of the bulb. If you’re planting into a heavy soil, add grit for drainage, as bulbs sat in water w

ill rot. You may want to cover the area with netting or wiring, to prevent mice and squirrels digging them up.

Think ahead to the spring months and the look you’re hoping to achieve. Are you wanting great swathes of tulips, or something in the way of companion planting? Plan and plant.

ROSES

Why not add fresh colour to next spring’s garden by planting roses. Bare root varieties are easier on the pocket than potted plants, and now’s the ideal time for planting. Ensure they are well-watered and thoroughly mulched to prevent frost from damaging the roots.

HEDGES

As we enter the dormant season, this is the ideal time to plant hedgerows and conifers. Before planting, ensure you incorporate plenty of organic matter into the soil. With clay soil, you may also want to add grit for drainage. Winter is a season of storms and high winds, so depending on the hedge, once planted it may need a support, and tying in, just until it establishes itself. Water in well, and mulch.

its-important-to-rake-fallen-autumn-leaves-and-clear-your-lawn-to-prevent-pests-and-other-problems

LAWN

Now’s the time to put away the lawn mower and reach for the rake. At this time of year, leaves will be constantly falling, creating debris on the lawn. By keeping your lawn free of leaves, you’re preventing pests taking shelter, and there’s no chance of damaging your lawn with the ‘browning off’ effect. Finally, if you wake to frosts, try to keep off the lawn, as you could potentially damage it.

 

MAINTENANCE

This is the time to retreat to your sheds and carry out maintenance work. From secateurs to shears, your tools could do with cleaning and sharpening after a season of use. Ensure all lawn mowers have been cleaned, checked, and drain off any fuel. It’s also an ideal time to clean and store pots and seed trays. Try to reduce waste and use less plastic by avoiding buying new pots, and using what you’ve got. Or, you could make your own pots. There are kits available for making biodegradable plant pots that will add a personal touch to your plant growing next season.

If you’re leaving stone or terracotta pots outside over winter, make sure they’re standing on clay feet to raise them off the ground, otherwise a ground frost can damage them and cause them to crack. Being raised also helps drain off excess water.

Pots can be expensive, so protect them as best you can by grouping them all together in the sunniest part of the garden. You could also try wrapping them in bubble wrap.

 

WILDLIFE

If you haven’t done so yet, fill your bird feeders. Ensure they’ve been thoroughly cleaned with warm soapy water, and rinsed.

Put out fresh water for the birds, but try to ensure it doesn’t ice over.

You can also consider building insect hotels. Leave small piles of wood in corners of your garden to allow wildlife somewhere to rest over winter.

On the veg patch

 

BROAD BEANS AND PEAS

If you’re hoping for an early crop next year, then now’s the time to sow. Ensure the ground is enriched with plenty of organic matter. With seeds planted, water in well and cover over with either a cloche or horticultural fleece. Not only will the seeds benefit from the extra warmth, but they’ll be protected from birds and vermin.

Certain crops benefit from a good frost, turning their starches into sugars. Vegetables such as parsnips, swede, and Brussels sprouts will be tastier after a cold spell. If you are lifting these crops on a cold day, make sure you do it with a fork, carefully prising them from the hardened soil.

SPRING CABBAGE

If you’ve sown cabbage seed weeks ago, then they should be healthy young plants by now. With five to six sets of leaves, they’ll be ready to be planted out. Ensure the bed has been well cultivated with plenty of organic matter dug in. Whatever the season, brassicas are hungry plants, so will need all the feeding they can get.

Charlotte potatoes in tyre planters

Plant your plants deep, to just below the first set of leaves, to prevent damage from ‘wind rock’. Water in well and mulch. You may also want to protect your plants with horticultural fleece or cloches.

CHRISTMAS POTATOES

If you’re growing spuds for the big day, then check them regularly. If they’re in grow bags or sacks, try to keep them somewhere, bright, warm and protected. As the stems gather height, ensure you earth them up. Not only will this encourage further tubers, but it will protect them from the chill. Finally, with dampness in the air and fluctuating temperatures, keep an eye out for blight.

GLUE BANDS

Pests will be looking for somewhere to rest up over the next few months, laying eggs and eating tender shoots which can have a devastating effect on fruit trees. Try wrapping glue bands around the trunk base of your apple, pear, cherry and plum trees to stop pests, such as winter moth caterpillars, climbing the trees to lay their eggs.

Other Jobs

Disconnect garden hoses and protect garden taps as frozen water can burst pipes.

Regularly check stored fruit, onions, squashes and potatoes for rot. Disregard any that have been spoilt.

With gardens dying back, you get a real sense of the blueprint of your garden. So, if you’re thinking of doing structural work, such as laying a new path or building a fence, this is a good time to do it.

If you are planning to have a bonfire to celebrate Guy Fawkes Night, then check the wood pile first for any wildlife taking shelter.

If you have any advice of your own for looking after the garden in November, comment below or head over to our Facebook and Twitter page.

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