Growing for cutting

March 1st, 2019 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Lupin 'Pink Fairy', Nicotiana 'Babybella' and Ridolphia segetum.A customer came into my friend’s florist shop recently and said: “You can’t get British cut flowers any more.” Well, apart from the fact that if she’d just looked out of the window she’d have seen the cutting garden from which flowers for the shop are cut – well, she could always grow her own!

So could we all and Mr F are helping out with a new range of plants specifically chosen for cutting. They’ll arrive in May, ideal planting time, and give you colourful cut flowers all summer.

Nicotiana ‘Babybella’ is a new deep red variety that I discussed here a few weeks ago that mixes well with ‘Florence Blue’ cornflowers. This cornflower variety is a lovely vivid blue but it’s shorter than most cut-flower cornflowers so doesn’t topple over in anything above a gentle breeze.

Both these plants are new to the Mr F plant range but I also picked out one or two familiar favourites from the Mr F range that are invaluable for cutting.

Salvia viridis, which used to be called Salvia horminum, is exceptionally long lasting in the garden and in the vase – mainly because it’s not the tiny flowers that generate the colour but the large leafy bracts around them.

Annual lupins make lovely cut flowers, they should be better known. The flowers of ‘Pink Fairy’ open white and then take on pink tones as they mature, they come on long string, but not think, stems and they have a strong scent too.

Finally I’d suggest a plant that you may not know, Ridolfia segetum. It’s a little like a sharp yellow cow parsley but far more refined and long lasting and it goes with almost anything in a garden bouquet.

There are more. Check out the new Mr F Cut Flower Range and be sure also to take a look at other annuals and perennials that are ideal for cutting. My list is getting longer, I’m not sure where I’m going to grow my veg this year…

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Is one of our best known gardening writers. A graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Graham was previously Gardening Correspondent of The Observer.
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