Help Mr Fothergill’s fundraise for charity

September 6th, 2017 | News | 0 Comments

At Mr Fothergill’s we like to support as many charities as we can – so far we’ve raised over £150,000. Over the last few years, we’ve supported and fundraised for the Royal Hospital Chelsea Appeal, Greenfingers Charity, and RSPB – among others!

For these charities, in particular, we’ve have been selling sweet peas, seeds or fundraising through events. If you’ve contributed to any of these, then thank you – all of these charities need help and we are grateful to have given them the chance to assist their causes further.

We’ve recently completed a 20 mile walk, that some of our team took part in to raise money for the Greenfingers Charity. You can find out more about our walk here. In addition to this walk, we’ve set up a page for each of the charities that we support – so if you’d like to help with our fundraising efforts, you can find each of the pages below.

 

 

 

If you’re going to donate your hard earned money to a charity, it’s important that you know what your generous donations are going towards. Each of these charities supports very different causes and all of them important.

Greenfingers Charity

Greenfingers Charity is dedicated to supporting the children who use hospices around the UK, along with their families, by creating beautiful, well-designed outdoor spaces for children to enjoy with family, friends and siblings, whether through play and fun, or therapeutic rest and relaxation.  To date, Greenfingers Charity has created 51 inspiring gardens and outdoor spaces in hospices around the country and has a further waiting list of hospices that need our help now.

RSPB

RSPB are the largest nature conservation charity in the country, consistently delivering successful conservation, forging powerful new partnerships with other organisations and inspiring others to stand up and give nature the home it deserves.

Royal Chelsea Appeal Limited

The Chelsea Pensioners are the iconic faces of the UK’s veteran community. They reside at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, their 325-year-old home founded by Charles II, in the heart of London.

Thank you in advance for all the support you’ve given us and these charities over the years, we hope we can continue to help them through the sale of our seeds and fundraising. 

 

 

Helping helpful insects

November 16th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

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We’ve heard so many of reports recently about the decline in insect populations, both pollinators and other insects, that many gardeners are wondering how they can help. Recent news of the decline in bird populations and the populations of other vertebrates is also rather chilling.

Insects are not only vital pollinators for our crops and for wild fruits and for seed-set in wild and garden flowers, but they also provide – not to put too fine a point on it – themselves as food for birds, small mammals, reptiles, amphibians and even other insects. A brood of ten blue tit chicks can get through one thousand caterpillars – per day! [At first, I didn’t believe that either but the British Trust for Ornithology confirms the figure]

But blue tits are also very efficient predators of aphids, and I’ve watched them dealing with infestations on roses and lupins very efficiently, carrying beakfuls off to their chicks.

Now, I’m not suggesting that we plant roses so that blue tits and other birds can feed on their aphids! But the help of gardeners can be crucial in two ways: firstly, by attracting wildlife of all kinds to our gardens through providing food and nest sites, and secondly by planting varieties that insects appreciate. Over the next few weeks I’ll be looking at different ways to help insects and other wildlife.

Of course, protecting natural habitats is crucial and one way of helping with that is to buy friends and relatives memberships of conservation organisations such as local wildlife trusts as Christmas gifts – and to join up yourself.

So that’s a start: your local wildlife trust. And next time I’ll be thinking about insect friendly flowers.

Make a difference with Mr Fothergill’s and BBC Children in Need

November 13th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

Together, let’s make a difference and grow seed! 30p from each packet of Sunflower Pudsey and Pumpkin Pudsey will go to BBC Children in Need.

We are delighted to announce our new partnership with BBC Children in Need, launching two new seed packets for children – Sunflower Pudsey and Pumpkin Pudsey. 30p from each packet sold will benefit BBC Children in Need, to help make a real difference to the lives of children all across the UK. Let’s join together and have some fun growing the tallest sunflower and scariest pumpkin and help make a difference.

BBC Children in Need believe that every child in the UK should have a childhood which is safe, happy and secure and allows them the chance to reach their potential. To help achieve their vision, they provide grants to projects in the UK which focus on children and young people who are disadvantaged. They currently support 2,400 of these projects. Since 1980, over £800 million has been raised in aid of BBC Children in Need.

Mr-Fothergills-Sunflower-Pudsey-in-aid-of-BBC-children-in-needFothergills

Sunflower Pudsey flowers the same year as sown. Easy, fast-growing with huge heads on giant stems. 75 seeds for only £1.99!

Pumpkin Pudsey is perfect for carving at Halloween – with sweet tasting orange flesh it’s perfect for pies, too. 100 seeds only £1.99!

For more information on BBC Children in Need and all the great work they do, head to www.bbc.co.uk/childreninneed.

8 Ways to Garden in Harmony with Nature

November 9th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

Gardens are special places where, as gardeners, we’re privileged to get up close to the natural world. But working with nature also makes you realise how precious it is. Our impact on the planet is well documented and it’s up to us to adopt more environmentally conscious ways of living. Growing your own food is a great start, but how you grow it makes all the difference.

Read on or watch the video as we share eight great ideas to help you garden more sustainably, in step with nature.

1. Use Human Power

Let’s start by replacing electric or gasoline-powered equipment such as lawnmowers, tillers and leaf-blowers with more sustainable human-powered alternatives whenever we can. It’ll save natural resources, and by breaking big jobs down into regular smaller blocks, it’s a great way to stay active and keep fit.

2. Work with Nature

Artificial fertilisers and pesticides are energy intensive to manufacture and carry many undesirable side effects, from polluting rivers to harming beneficial insects and soil life.

A natural approach – adding organic materials to the soil to build long-term soil fertility, and planting flowers to attract pest predators – avoids these negative impacts while creating a livelier, healthier garden.

3. Plant Trees

Trees lock up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping mitigate the effects of our changing climate. Let’s plant more of them! Trees range from tiny to massive to suit every space, and can be planted into otherwise wasted or underused parts of the garden. Most are easy to grow and many trees are productive too – just think of a handsome apple tree, for example.

Trees offer birds somewhere to nest, feed and shelter. In return they will keep many plant pests in check while contributing their melodious song.

4. The Best Plant Food

Much of our waste can be composted. Composting is a natural process and a far more environmentally friendly alternative to burying it in landfill. Garden-made compost is often richer in valuable nutrients than bought-in sources of compost.

Make your own and enjoy a free source of natural fertiliser to feed your soil and the plants growing in it. Setting up a simple compost bin or heap doesn’t take long. It’s easy to add to and, don’t worry, it won’t smell!

5. Reconsider Your Lawn

Lawns demand a lot of effort and watering to stay green, especially in hotter climates. How much lawn do you really need? Can any of it be repurposed? For example, a native wildflower meadow only needs cutting once or twice a year.

Make the lawn that remains more sustainable by simply leaving the grass to grow a little longer between cuts. Then leave the clippings where they fall at least once a month to return their nutrients to the soil.

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6. Upcycle and Reuse

Don’t be in a haste to throw away old pots and seed containers. Reuse them as often as you can by washing them after each season so they’re ready and clean for the next. Look after your tools by storing them somewhere dry so they last longer. Keep moving parts oiled, and sharpen blades regularly so they work like new.

Opt for lower energy, natural materials in the garden – from biodegradable pots made of coir, cardboard or even old newspaper, to

a greenhouse built from sustainable wood in place of aluminium.

Many gardeners are only too happy to repurpose old items into new ones for the garden. And there’s all sorts of fun to be had in getting creative!

7. Free Resources, Naturally

Nature gives us lots for free. Set up barrels to collect rainfall and cut your consumption of treated water – and your water bill! Rake up fallen leaves to make leaf mould – the perfect material for improving soil structure or creating your own, packaging-free potting mix.

Create more spaces for wildlife. Flowers rich in nectar feed pollinators, as well as drawing in other insects to feed on the bugs you don’t want. Include a pond for frogs and toads – the ultimate slug controllers!

Extra room for wildlife doesn’t mean sacrificing valuable ground space. For example, install a green roof on your shed or put together a simple bug hotel. Projects like this are great fun for adults and kids alike. Many projects are easily completed in a weekend to bring benefits lasting long into the future.

8. Grow What Thrives

Growing plants that naturally thrive in your location means you’ll enjoy more success and less heartache. Pick the right plant for the right place: for example, vegetables like tomatoes and beans for sunny areas or leafy salads in the shade.

Not sure? Then use the fully searchable GrowVeg Garden Plans Gallery to see what others are growing in your area and seek some inspiration. Or step in and explore the GrowVeg Garden Planner for yourself. It’s easy to narrow down the selection of plants to, for example, those that will happily grow in partial shade or are frost tolerant. And because the software knows your location, you can even filter the list to show only those plants suitable for sowing, planting or harvesting during a specific month in your location. Simple!

Don’t be in too much of a hurry at the start of the growing season. Work back from the last frost date so tender crops like squashes aren’t sown too early and are ready to plant when the time’s right. This will also minimise the need for costly heating. The Garden Planner includes a handy Plant List to help with this too!

Of course, growing any fruits, vegetables or herbs is a big step towards a more Earth-friendly lifestyle, so grow as much as you can: plan ahead, re-sow throughout the growing season and set aside some of your homegrown bounty for the leaner times of the year. You’ll be doing yourself and the planet a world of good.

If you have any tips of tricks for gardening more naturally, comment below or head over to our Facebook and Twitter page.

Help Mr Fothergill’s Commemorate Armistice Day with Poppy Victoria Cross

November 9th, 2018 | News | 0 Comments

This Remembrance weekend, all proceeds from each packet of Mr Fothergill’s Poppy Victoria Cross sold will be donated to the Chelsea Pensioners of the Royal Chelsea Hospital Appeal.

Help-Mr-Fothergills-commemorate-Armistice-Day-this-weekend-with-Poppy Victoria-Cross

Over the last four years we’ve been donating 25p from the sale of every packet of Poppy Victoria Cross to the Royal Hospital Chelsea. You’ve helped us to raise over £75,000 so far – that’s more than 300,000 packets and 75 million poppy seeds!

PoppThis-remembrance-weekend-all-proceeds-from-poppy-victoria-cross-will-be-donated-to-royal-chelsea-hospitaly-Victoria-Cross-is-a-popular-choice-among-gardeners-and-makes-a-fitting-remembrance-symbol-with-its-bold-white-crosses-across-single-red-flowers

With the anniversary of the end of the Great War approaching, we thought it would be fitting to commemorate this special Armistice Day by donating the entire £2.10 packet price of Poppy Victoria Cross to the Chelsea Pensioners. This offer applies to all packets sold from now until midnight on Armistice Day, Sunday 11th November 2018.

The Royal Hospital Chelsea was established in 1682 by Charles II to provide a safe home for military veterans ‘broken by age or war’. The Christopher Wren-designed Royal Hospital admitted its first pensioners in 1692. Rachael Ferguson, corporate partnerships officer at the Royal Hospital Chelsea said “We are delighted at Mr Fothergill’s continued support, which is well known among and appreciated by the Chelsea Pensioners. The backing from the company and its thousands of customers, for which we are grateful, is quite remarkable”.

Please note that there is a £1.95 P&P charge for all seed orders, including single packets. However, this is a fixed charge no matter how many packets of seed you buy. Head to mr-fothergills.co.uk for more.

 

Two more old favourites return

November 9th, 2018 | Plant Talk with Graham Rice | 0 Comments

Omphalodes ‘Little Snow White’ and Silene ‘Blue Angel’

Our attention often strays from colourful and dependable hardy annuals that have been around for years towards brighter and brasher new introductions. And it’s not just we gardeners.

Seed companies, too, and the companies that produce the seed they sell, can let their focus wander and the result is that good varieties either deteriorate so they become much less appealing or they vanish from catalogues altogether.

Well, last week I brought you news of a dwarf double sunflower that Mr F have bright back, and this week I’ve news of two more. These are two hardy annuals that I haven’t grown for years but which I always used to enjoy self seeding around the garden.

Omphalodes ‘Little Snow White’ is a dainty hardy annual related to forget-me-nots with narrow greyish leaves and small clear white flowers. Growing about 35-40cm in height, it can sown in spring or in autumn (though it’s probably a little late now) and will flower for two or three months from May (autumn sowing) or July (spring sowing).

I’m going to grow it again next year, sowing a row for cutting and then transplanting the thinnings wherever I think they’ll look the part. It’ll be good to have it back.

Silene (Viscaria) ‘Blue Angel’ is also back and that too will be on my seedlist, especially as there are relatively few low hardy annuals with such lovely blue blooms. Reaching only 20-25cm in height, the slender stems carry flat-faced, dark-eyed flowers

Sow from March to June and expect flowers about three months after sowing. As with the omphalodes, self sown seedlings will pop up for next year. The fact is that it’s impractical to deadhead either of them so don’t even try – just allow them to cast their seed and enjoy them wherever they pop up.